English Arabic Armenian Azerbaijani Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Czech Danish Dutch Estonian Filipino Finnish French Galician Georgian German Greek Hindi Hungarian Icelandic Indonesian Italian Japanese Korean Latvian Lithuanian Malay Maltese Norwegian Persian Polish Portuguese Russian Slovak Slovenian Spanish Swedish Thai Turkish Ukrainian Vietnamese
european-commission-supports-hna-purchase-of-frankfurt-hahn-airportFRANKFURT HAHN: August 10, 2017. The HNA Group has completed its acquisition of Frankfurt-Hahn airport from the German state of...
matson-to-add-marshall-islands-serviceHONOLULU: AUGUST 07, 2017. Matson is adding to its Marshall Islands (RMI) service in the first quarter of 2018 with a new biweekly...
fortune-50-companies-back-no-fee-recruitment-in-supply-chainsNEW YORK, NY: AUGUST 07, 2017. Ford, General Motors, Hormel Foods, Marriott Hotels and Michael Kors have agreed to promote ethical...
xpo-on-the-m-a-road-againGREENWICH, CT: August 04, 2017. XPO Logistics has reported a net income of US$73.2 million on revenue of US$7.3 billion for the...
hyperloop-one-lifts-offNEW YORK: August 02, 2017. Following a successful first test last month, the vacuum transport system built by Hyperloop One has now...
no-american-investment-from-qatar-airwaysDOHA: August 02, 2017. Qatar Airways is not proceeding with its initial 7.5 percent "passive" stake in American Airlines (AA) for an...

Call us civilised?

The destruction of Malaysia Airlines MH17 is a reminder that the barbarous behaviour of the Middle Ages hasn't disappeared with 21st century globalisation.

While the airline industry plays a vital role in civilising humanity - transporting three billion people and 35 percent of global trade by value - it is an economic and social enabler that remains, quite literally, far above the local horror that is Iraq, Syria, the Gaza Strip, northern Nigeria, the DRC or eastern Ukraine.

So when chaos and commerce suddenly and violently collide, it is a reminder of how fragile is "the instrument of peace" - as IATA CEO Tony Tyler describes international aviation.

While politicians debate, the airline industry just gets on with the job of connecting millions of people and thousands of businesses, every hour, every day.

Although this is not the first time a commercial airliner has been shot down by mistake, the cynical indifference of those who enabled such a senseless act near Donetsk do not deserve to be called leaders – or even "separatists".

If air transport is to continue its role in the 21st century as Tyler hopes, Ukraine will need more than talk from the EU to ensure Aleksandr Borodai and his mentors are delivered to the International Criminal Court in The Hague.

- author Simon Keeble is the editor of Freightweek

- powered by Quickchilli.com -